Bad news for “progressives”: Casual teen sex leads to poor performance in school

Posted by: ST on August 17, 2010 at 9:56 pm

A new study confirms what many of us have being saying for a long time now: Casual sex is bad for teenagers. Via AP:

LOS ANGELES (AP) – There’s good news for parents who worry that their teenagers’ sex lives are affecting their school performance: A provocative new study has found that teens in committed relationships do no better or worse in school than those who don’t have sex.

The same isn’t true for teens who “hook up.” Researchers found that those who have casual flings get lower grades and have more school-related problems compared with those who abstain.

The findings, presented Sunday at a meeting of the American Sociological Association in Atlanta, challenge to some extent assumptions that sexually active teens tend to do poorer in school.

It’s not so much whether a teen has sex that determines academic success, the researchers say, but the type of sexual relationship they’re engaged in. Teens in serious relationships may find social and emotional support in their sex partners, reducing their anxiety and stress levels in life and in school.

“This should give some comfort to parents who may be concerned that their teenage son or daughter is dating,” said sociologist Peggy Giordano of Bowling Green State University, who had no role in the research. Teen sex is “not going to derail their educational trajectories,” she said.

Last year, nearly half of high school students reported having sexual intercourse, and 14 percent have had four or more partners, according to a federal survey released this summer.

Just to be sure, conservative prudes like myself would ideally like for teens to abstain from sex until they’re old enough to at the very least have a mature relationship with someone (college, perhaps – PLEASE) but if they’re not going to wait, at least get into a committed relationship in high school rather than “hook up” all the time, which can have disastrous consequences … and not just related to school performance.

But really, how often do teens have “committed” relationships in high school that last more than a few weeks? Anyway …

Back to the study, more bad news for “free love” types:

-Teens in serious relationships did not differ from their abstinent counterparts in terms of their grade-point average, how attached they are to school or college expectations. They were also not more likely to have problems in school, be suspended or absent.

-Compared with virgins, teens who have casual sex had lower GPAs, cared less about school and experienced more problems in school. For example, female teens who have flings had GPAs that were 0.16 points lower than abstinent teens. Male teens who have casual sex had GPAs that were 0.30 points lower than those who do not have sex. Teens who hook up also were at greater risk of being suspended or expelled and had lower odds of expecting to go to college.

-Teens who have sex – whether it’s a serious or casual relationship – were at higher risk of being truant and dropping out compared with teens who don’t have sex. The researchers said the dropout results should be interpreted with caution because the numbers were small.

“Having sex outside of a romantic relationship may exacerbate the stress youths experience, contributing to problems in school,” Grodsky said.

In a statement, the Family Research Council said the study confirms what the group has long advocated about the negative consequences of casual sex.

But the council said it “would not interpret less severe educational impacts on students involved in ‘committed’ sexual relationships as a green light for comprehensive” sex education.

University of Southern California sociologist Julie Albright disagreed. She said it might be time to revamp sex education to “emphasize the importance of relationships and spell out the consequences of casual sex.”

If so-called “comprehensive sex education” included that information, that would be probably the best thing teenagers would get out of it.

In any event, this news has to suckage big time for the casual sex crowd on the left who believe that proper ‘sex ed’ for young people includes the “cucumber demo,” among other explicit topics (not that they’re trying to encourage teens to have sex, oh no …). Granted, hearing that teenagers in a committed relationship having sex is not necessarily ‘bad’ for them is not what people like me want to hear, but again, I’d rather it be in a committed relationship than a series of brief, meaningless flings. Something more may come out of that commitment, but you can best be sure that nothing will come out of the casual sex flings except perhaps disease, maybe a baby, and – if you’re a woman – a bad reputation.

It ain’t worth it. Respect yo’self!

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6 Responses to “Bad news for “progressives”: Casual teen sex leads to poor performance in school”

Comments

  1. Rho says:

    No mention of how bad the devastation is for those who thought they were in a committed relationship and found out their partner wasn’t! I teach 9th graders and see this happen all the time- can derail some kids.

  2. Ah, but you know the response from the so-called progressives: They’re going to do it anyway! Can’t stop it!

  3. Carlos says:

    Obviously this report is just a missive from the VRWC.

  4. Liz says:

    Causation versus correlation. It may not be that casual sex per se is *causing* problems, but that teenagers without familial support, recognised achievements or expectations for after school are more likely to have it.

    It could also be that the more accomplished and intelligent teens are the ones with the ability and support to sustain committed relationships. Just a thought.

  5. Patrick says:

    Repeat after me. “Correlation is not causation.” Cities with more police tend to have more crime, but that doesn’t mean police officers cause crime.

  6. Carlos says:

    And everyone who has ever eaten an egg either has died or will die.

    Sometimes reasons for results have nothing to do with what is being studied.