Photo of the Day from Occupy Charlotte: “I’m $100k in debt. I’m 22. Yay College”


Again, in spite of the duhnials coming from the various “Occupy leaders” around the country that the marches currently taking place in various cities around the country are full of “diverse” groups of “all types,” this movement IS full of clueless slackers, actual hippies, college-age hippies in training, diehard unionistas, and other various “gimme mine” types who – oddly – rail against government bailouts but yet who demand that the government bail THEM out. This picture, taken from yesterday’s “Occupy Charlotte” protest, says it all:

Photo from Occupy Charlotte - 10/8/11

Photo from Occupy Charlotte - 10/8/11. Taken by @sherilucia

Need I say more? Oh – but I will. I “live Tweeted” a lot of the happenings going on yesterday even though I wasn’t there, and saw a picture of someone who brought their infant child – a potential kiddie human shield* – with them, and also watched a disturbing video from their first gathering in which cult-like chants and hand-raising seemed to be the norm – the same type of mindset, chants, and weird hand displays can be seen in this video of the Occupy Atlanta protest from yesterday where, I kid you not, the “General Assembly” of Occupy Atlanta denied civil rights activist Rep. John Lewis a chance to speak.

Unsurprisingly, we have to look to UK news outlets for other disturbing media from the various “Occupy” protests, including one of a disgusting punk defecating on a police cruiser. I don’t have to tell you how big this news would be had it been a Tea Partier doing something so despicable.

Again, lamestream media, these thugs and other various and assorted “Gimmieites” are NOTHING like the freedom-loving Tea Partiers.

The Charlotte Observer reports there were between 500 and 600 protesters in uptown Charlotte yesterday, with approximately 35 camping out overnight. More protests are in the works for later this week, and definitely for Saturday afternoon.

I got into a “discussion” of sorts yesterday with a “We are the 99%” liberal who tried to “help” me with an issue I posted about on Twitter. I have a close family member who works at BOA uptown and I was concerned about her safety so much to the point that I called her to warn her about what she may see on Monday (angry wackos occupying the bank lobby and trying to prevent customers from having their needs met and workers from getting to their offices). Fortunately, she’ll probably be working from home tomorrow. Shortly after talking to her. I quipped on Twitter about how the “occupiers” view people like that family member as “corporately owned” because they worked for BOA. The “We are the 88%” guy (who went by the Twitter handle “@OccupyHomes“) responded to me by saying:

Is she a gov’t worker paid by BoA? If so, yes. If not, she is a private sector worker. I hope this helps you overcome.

Gee, I feel so much better now that I’m “better informed” about which category my family member falls into (for the record, she’s a private sector worker. Whew).

As to the larger point, my friend Dr. Melissa Clouthier earlier Tweeted what I feel is the question of the weekend:

Where were these Occupy Wallstreet types when the #Teaparty was decrying bank bailouts?

The answer is because, unlike these “The Man owes me something” types, Tea Partiers don’t support taxpayer bailouts for anyone, not corporations and not individuals. Ideally, if you get yourself into debt it’s up to you to get yourself out of it – no matter whether you’re GM or John Doe. If you’ve got a college loan debt, you work to pay it off. No one forced you nor your parents to sign on the dotted line on those loan documents. IOW, you aren’t “owed” anything by anyone. In short, it’s about a little thing called “personal responsibility.”

Naturally, the “me first” types at these protests, who are mostly self-centered college kids (no surprise) and aging hippies who never grew up, don’t understand nor support such a seemingly antiquated concept. And yet the myth persists that it’s conservatives who are the “selfish” ones?

(Note: Click here for more on the myth about alleged lack of generosity on the part of conservatives)

Lastly, you’ve got to find it mildly ironic – not to mention hilarious – that these so-called “anti-corporatists” are using their corporate Droid phones to communicate, drinking corporate Starbucks coffee to “stay awake,” and are using their iPads to “document” and “report” on all the happenings at their respective Occupy headquarters. Not to mention the corporate clothing they’re wearing and corporate food they’re eating …

Oh, and speaking of eating and drinking, you’ve GOT to see this (bolded emphasis added by me):

Panini and Company Cafe normally sells sandwiches to tourists in Lower Manhattan and the residents nearby, but in recent days its owner, Stacey Tzortzatos, has also become something of a restroom monitor. Protesters from Occupy Wall Street, who are encamped in a nearby park, have been tromping in by the scores, and not because they are hungry.

Ms. Tzortzatos’s tolerance for the newcomers finally vanished when the sink was broken and fell to the floor. She installed a $200 lock on the bathroom to thwart nonpaying customers, angering the protesters.

“I’m looked at as the enemy of the people,” she said.

The anticorporate participants in Occupy Wall Street, which began three weeks ago, say they have no intention of leaving soon. The protest has been building in size, with sister demonstrations erupting in other cities, and politicians, labor leaders and celebrities adding their support. But for many neighborhood businesses, the protest’s end cannot come soon enough. In interviews, business owners said they were especially annoyed that the organizers of the grass-roots movement neglected to include portable toilets in their plan to bring down Wall Street.

Residents, too, say they are losing patience.

Mothers have grown weary of navigating strollers through the maze of barricades that have sprouted along the streets. Toddlers have been roused from sleep just after bedtime by chanting and pounding drums.

Heather Amato, 35, a psychologist who lives near the protest area, said she felt disturbed by some of the conduct of the protesters. She said she had to shield her toddler from the sight of women at the park dancing topless. “It’s been three weeks now,” Ms. Amato said. “Enough is enough.”

Local politicians have expressed sympathy for the residents’ complaints, even as they try to avoid offending the protesters. The speaker of the State Assembly, Sheldon Silver, a Democrat whose district includes Zuccotti Park, the site of the protests, said on Wednesday that the neighborhood had been burdened enough by the protesters’ takeover of one of the few parks in the area.

“I would suggest that they move their message to other parts of the city and state,” Mr. Silver said.

Zuccotti Park is privately owned but open to the public. Melissa Coley, a spokeswoman for Brookfield Office Properties, which owns the park, said in a statement that sanitation conditions had reached “unacceptable levels.”

“We continue to work with the City of New York to address these conditions and restore the park to its intended purpose,” the statement read.

Brookfield apparently has not asked the police to remove the protesters. On Friday, Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg said that the authorities were somewhat limited because Zuccotti was not in the city park system, which usually bars people from sleeping overnight in parks.

Still, Mr. Bloomberg expressed sympathy for residents. On his radio show, he received a call from a woman whose apartment overlooks the park.

“I want to know about my rights to use that park,” the woman said. “This is our little sliver of greenery that we reclaimed after Sept. 11. It’s now unusable. There is a general presence of incivility down there.

Mr. Bloomberg responded, “We are trying to deal with this in a way that doesn’t make the problem grow and protects everybody’s rights.”

Several businesses said they had no choice but to respond to the influx of protesters by closing bathrooms.

Mike Keane, who owns O’Hara’s Restaurant and Pub, said that the theft of soap and toilet paper had soared and that one protester had used the bathroom but had failed to properly use the toilet. Both Ms. Tzortzatos, owner of the Panini and Company Cafe, and Mr. Keane said the protesters rarely bought anything, yet hurled curses when they were told that only paying customers could use their bathrooms.

Steve Zamfotis, manager of another nearby store, Steve’s Pizza, said: “They are pests. They go to the bathroom and don’t even buy a cup of coffee.”

Mr. Zamfotis closed his bathroom after it repeatedly flooded from protesters’ bathing there.

Kira Annika, a spokeswoman for the protesters, wrote in an e-mail that she had not heard such complaints: “We were under the impression that the local business community appreciated our patronage.”

In a widely distributed pamphlet, “Welcome to Liberty Plaza: Home of Occupy Wall Street,” participants were instructed where to find relief. “After you’ve dined,” it reads, “feel free to refresh yourself in the restrooms of neighboring businesses like Burger King and McDonald’s without feeling obligated to buy anything.”

You stay classy, leftists.

*The reason I object so strongly to leftists (I don’t have an issue with conservatives doing so) bringing their children with them to protests is because of the tendency of some of the more fanatical left wing protesters to get rowdy and violent, which then of course brings in the police, the pepper pray, etc. Liberals, of course, know this – which is exactly why they bring young kids to protests because they know a police officer would never knowingly harm a child. As far as I’m concerned, any parent who brings their child to a liberal protest is guilty of child abuse. Like this idiot “mother.”

Game Day: Saints at The Panthers (UPDATE: PANTHERS LOSE 30-27)


Panthers logoIt’s a beautiful early fall-like day here in Charlotte – the temperature is 68 degrees, the sun is shining, the leaves are falling off the trees … and the Panthers are playing here at home against their division rivals the New Orleans Saints. New Orleans is tied with the Bucs atop the NFC South at 3-1, while the Panthers are dwelling in the cellar at 1-3. Their record, however, is deceiving as their losses haven’t been the blowouts and/or the “no competition” games we Panthers fans had gotten used to seeing over the last few years. That’s thanks in large part to rookie QB Cam Newton and an offensive line that has seen its spirit come alive again. “Coming close to victory” is not an actual win, true. But in the eyes of many here, it’s the best we can hope for as the Panthers continue to rebuild under new head coach Ron Rivera.

The questions are: Can our special teams get it together after their disastrous performance last week? Will our defense show some renewed toughness against the Saints’ o-line? Hard to say. The Panthers D is, as says this week, “injury-riddled.” Not only that but Cam Newton, while throwing for some phenomenal yardage in all four games – and while impressively scoring a few rushing TDs as well, is still a rookie who makes rookie mistakes.

We’ll see how it all plays out at 1 pm ET (on Fox) when the Saints come marching in and onto the field against the Panthers.

An interesting sidenote to today’s game: Kicker John Kasay, the longest serving player with the Carolina Panthers (16 seasons) who was released after last season, is now playing for the Saints. Kasay was the last of the “originals” left with the Panthers as 1995 was the ‘Cats inaugural season. I hope fans today will be classy enough to give him a warm welcome.

My office pool picks for this week: PIT, NYG, CIN, CAR, OAK, PHIL, IND, MIN, SF, NE, SD, ATL, CHI (39 points for Monday night game)

Update – 5:14 PM: Close again but no cigar. Thanks to self-defeating issues like calling a timeout with 2 seconds on the clock in the first half, allowing your opponent to get set up for a FG, cost us once again as we fall to the Saints 30-27.