ST in the Media: Tammy Bruce interviews Sister Toldjah about OWS


Did a podcast earlier with this evening with reformed liberal and left coast wild woman Tammy Bruce, in which we discussed the various Occupy movements around the country – including Occupy Charlotte, and what it means going forward. You can listen to it here.

I wanted to say more about Occupy Seattle events from yesterday but I rambled a bit and Tammy understandably moved on. :-D


Let me repeat this: Women are NOT safe at #OWS communes


How many times does it have to be said?

Alleged sexual assaults at Occupy Wall Street camps have raised concerns about security in a handful of cities, including reports of rape and groping in tents at New York’s Zuccotti Park and a sex offender in Dallas having sex with an underage runaway.

“These protests have a history of welcoming everyone and just assuming they’re on your side,” said David Meyer, a professor of sociology at the University of California at Irvine, who studies protest movements.

The recent reports of assaults have created a problem the “Occupy” movement is being challenged to address head-on.

“We always encourage victims to go through the proper channels and contact police,” said Brendan Burke, 41, who helps run the security team in Zuccotti Park.

But that’s not always the case. Burke admitted there have been times when members of the community have taken it upon themselves to chase off men who exposed themselves in the park.

“If there is a consensus that someone is bothering another person, the community will take care of it,” he said. “Still, we always notify victims to contact police.”

New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg — addressing the allegations of sexual assault today — said the reported practice of chasing perpetrators, rather than reporting them to police, is “despicable.” If the reports are true, he said, the protesters have made the city less safe.

I guarantee you Brendan Burke and any other member of any so-called “Occupy security team” are flat out lying. Occupy camps have an unwritten rule (written in the case of Occupy Baltimore) that essentially equates to the “no snitch” policy you’ve heard about that is followed in areas where crime rates are high. Instead, crime victims are encouraged to report crimes “internally” – not only that, but the alleged perps are also viewed as “victims” (surprise).

As I’ve said before, yes, we all get to enjoy the right to freedom of speech in this country, but when your free speech starts leading to public safety/health/resources issues, then public officials have the right – no, the obligation to step in and try to resolve the situation.

I’ll also say this: If you are a big city mayor who is having to try to figure out ways to handle the growing mobs at these Occupy communes, and you aren’t doing ANYTHING about it because you fear political blow back, you should be kicked out of office the next election cycle for dereliction of duty. It’s outrageous that most of these communes were even allowed to be “up and running” for even two weeks, let alone a month or more. The potential for crime, public health/sanitation issues, etc – not to mention the drain on already-strained city resources, is MORE than enough reason to say: ENOUGH IS ENOUGH.

The heart of the #Occupy movement is violence


**Posted by Phineas

The original Occupy movement

(Larger version)

What was I saying about the “new Vandals?”

Conn Carroll of The Washington Examiner today presents video of Occupy Oakland “staff” trying to stop others from trashing a local Whole Foods store. But, as Carroll points out, the presence of Occupy Oakland “officials” tells us they had some idea trouble would break out, yet went ahead with the march, anyway, thus making them responsible.

Why? Because the central idea of Occupy is the seizure of control of another’s property. His final paragraph lays bare the violent logic at the core of the movement:

…When you assert control over something that someone else owns (Brookfield Properties, the taxpayers, etc), there is eventually going to be a physical confrontation when that owner tries to reassert control. That is what we are seeing in police/occupier clashes across the country.

And this is what President Obama, the Chairwoman of the Democratic Party, and sundry others, have aligned themselves with.

Again, this is no longer an issue of freedom of speech; no one is advocating that free political speech be repressed — as long as the rights of others are respected. But these people have crossed a line by trampling on the property rights of others (1) and threatening their livelihoods and even their safety. It is time for city mayors to do the jobs for which they are being paid and order the mobs to disperse — and to send in the police to enforce the order, if need be.

(1) And I don’t just mean who physically owns the ground; companies of all sizes have shareholders, and those shareholders, whether individual investors or big investment houses (who in turn serve individual investors) have a property interest in their shares in those businesses and in their future profits. Same with sole owners of small businesses, whether it’s a hot dog cart on a corner near Zuccotti Park or a crafts store in Oakland. When Occupy “does its thing,” it harms the very people it claims to be fighting for. What about their rights?

(Crossposted at Public Secrets)

Solyndra: taxpayer-funded bonuses for the bankrupt — Update: subpoena issued


**Posted by Phineas

Remember when Congress, the MSM, and President Obama were all aghast and outraged at the bonuses paid to AIG execs after the 2008 crash?

So you can be sure they’ll be pounding the podium over bonuses paid to executives of now-bankrupt Solyndra:

Karen Alter, senior vice president of marketing, received two $55,000 bonuses on April 15 and July 8 of this year, on top of her $250,000 annual salary.

Ben Bierman, executive vice president of operations and engineering, received $120,000 in bonuses this year on top of his $276,000 salary.

Paula Camporaso, vice president of information technology — $80,000 in bonuses on top of her $107,000 salary.

Dave Sanat, vice president of supply chain — $80,000 in bonuses on top of his $111,000 salary.

Bill Stover, the company’s CFO who took the fifth before Congress at a September hearing, was awarded at least $120,000 in bonuses on top of his $367,000 salary.

The document also reveals that Chris Gronet, one of Solyndra’s founders, was “transitioned to the role of adviser and consultant” from his position as CEO on July 1, 2011, and negotiated a severance package worth more than $450,000.

I especially like paying a hundred grand in bonuses to a “marketing” exec for a company that couldn’t sell enough product to stay in business. I bet they all had MBAs, too.

Bear in mind that Solyndra was a failing company: it was paying out more than it was taking in. The bonuses were essentially made possible by the loans Solyndra received from the Department of Energy. Even if no loan cash went directly into these bandits’ paychecks, the loans made them possible — money is fungible.

Meanwhile, as Stiles points out in the article, these clowns get to keep their money, but, thanks to the loan “deal” agreed to by the DoE, the taxpayer (that’s you and I) has a lower claim to any money recovered through a sale of Solyndra’s assets than do the private investors.

Obama is so good to his “friends!”

RELATED: Earlier posts on Solyndra.

PS: As a friend pointed out, isn’t it interesting how the various Occupy groups who are so angry at the banks have had nothing to say about the money the Obama Administration has blown on various “Green schemes?” Guess that’s different… somehow.

via Power Line, which also lists the… interesting pattern of political donations made by these executives.

UPDATE: The House Energy and Commerce Investigations subcommittee has lost patience with the White House’s stalling and has issued a subpoena for documents relating to Solyndra.

(Crossposted at Public Secrets)