VW labor rep: We may punish the South in the future over Chattanooga UAW rejection

Posted by: ST on February 19, 2014 at 6:07 pm
Anti-union

Union thuggery in action once again.

Via Reuters:

Volkswagen’s top labor representative threatened on Wednesday to try to block further investments by the German carmaker in the southern United States if its workers there are not unionized.

Workers at VW’s factory in Chattanooga, Tennessee, last Friday voted against representation by the United Auto Workers union (UAW), rejecting efforts by VW representatives to set up a German-style works council at the plant.

German workers enjoy considerable influence over company decisions under the legally enshrined “co-determination” principle which is anathema to many politicians in the U.S. who see organized labor as a threat to profits and job growth.

Chattanooga is VW’s only factory in the U.S. and one of the company’s few in the world without a works council.

“I can imagine fairly well that another VW factory in the United States, provided that one more should still be set up there, does not necessarily have to be assigned to the south again,” said Bernd Osterloh, head of VW’s works council.

“If co-determination isn’t guaranteed in the first place, we as workers will hardly be able to vote in favor” of potentially building another plant in the U.S. south, Osterloh, who is also on VW’s supervisory board, said.

And in just the threat alone, this repulsive union rep provides a prime example of one of the many reasons the UAW representation was soundly rejected by Chattanooga VW plant workers: thuggery, threats, and bullying.  Don’t let the door hit ya, a**wipe.

BTW, here’s how Ed Kilgore at the popular left wing site Washington Monthly spun the news (bolded emphasis added by me):

This news  falls with the predictable weight of another shoe dropping, but it’s interesting that it’s happening so fast, even as conservatives everywhere are still celebrating the successful intimidation of VW workers in Tennessee by local Republican politicians:

Got that? Both sides of the debate presented arguments for or against the UAW proposal, and ultimately the anti-UAW group decisively won.  As a result of the vote not going their way, a VW labor rep essentially tells the TN workers who rejected the UAW that it will be their fault if VW decides not to invest anymore in the South beyond Chattanooga.

Assuming for purposes of debate let’s say that VW did decide to build another plant in the South in the future (which would  make sense, considering Southern GOP Governors and their state legislatures have pushed hard over the last few years to make their states more friendly to businesses), not hinging any deal on potential unionization.  Yet when they do try later to unionize the plant – and you know inevitably they would, workers there are going to feel obligated to vote in favor of it because they’ll remember this threat and want to keep their jobs.

But it’s Republicans who are “intimidating” VW employees (and potential future employees).  Oookay. Right is wrong, wrong is right, and the facts just don’t matter to the left, especially when it comes to healthcare and, of course, jobs – as we’ve seen quite a bit over the last couple of weeks.  It’s maddeningly pathetic, but predictable all the same.

(Hat tip: Memeorandum)

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12 Responses to “VW labor rep: We may punish the South in the future over Chattanooga UAW rejection”

Comments

  1. Drew the Infidel says:

    The Volkswagen, meaning “people’s car”, was the brainchild of Adolf Hitler. They can take their Nazi enterprise someplace else where it and the new locale will be deserving of one another.

  2. Carlos says:

    “works council,” huh?

    Sounds like the lazy-butt German workers have a ton of money invested in the plants they work at, the company running only at the say-so of “the works councils” and VW doesn’t have any investment in operations at all!

    What a bunch of spoiled-child socialist pigs.

  3. Peakview says:

    The following passage from the article is not true.
    “… which is anathema to many politicians in the U.S. who see organized labor as a threat to profits and job growth”
    It anathema to the unions and left-leaning politicians. It is enshrined in US law that German-style work councils are illegal. It is considered a “company union”. Illegal. Our current laws therefore REQUIRE unions to be adversarial. This maintains the unions political power and the left-leaning politicians ability to grift donations from the unions. How nice.

  4. Dana says:

    It was the Volkswagen workers themselves who rejected union representation. I guess that doesn’t mean anything to labor organizers, does it?

  5. Dave says:

    Exactly, the UAW are whiny babies because the workers told them to pound sand. Our gov makes the works council illegal because they know the UAW would be tossed out in favor of them.

    And you first two commentators? You are both blithering morons. VW and Audi are ten times the car that Ford or Chevrolet is so both of you go pound sand, idiots.

  6. redneek24 says:

    While the rejection of UAW might stop another VW Plant, I bet it brings even more into the south.

  7. DamnCat says:

    The German union IG Metall which has workers at other VW plants pushed hard for TN workers to join UAW. But there is an inherent conflict of interest here since making American plants less competitive – as UWA representation would certainly do – benefits the German union. UAW is getting nothing from them now – so they will happily trade the workers’ future growth for any portion of their current pay they can get. Both unions hold the unions’ interests above that of the laborers. The TN plant workers were wise to decline the offer to enter the spider’s parlor.

  8. Tuerqas says:

    I do have a bit of a problem that some commenters would speak so ignorantly of German workers. Their economy is almost singlehandedly holding up the entire EU. If they left, the EU would collapse immediately and everyone who is up on the subject knows it. We should be so lazy…

  9. ST says:

    Dana wrote:

    It was the Volkswagen workers themselves who rejected union representation. I guess that doesn’t mean anything to labor organizers, does it?

    Nope!

  10. Carlos says:

    Tuerqas wrote:

    I do have a bit of a problem that some commenters would speak so ignorantly of German workers.

    My comment above (#2) wasn’t about the average German worker, but about those who have to have unions to protect their inability to keep up or just be lazy or incompetent. Without any real, tangible investment in whatever plant they work in, what does a union worker have to worry about?

    It’s the owners and investors who have a real and tangible stake in the plant(s), but the German auto worker have apparently stolen the companies’ abilities to make sound fiscal decisions without bowing and scraping to the union.

    Bravo!!! to the Tennessee workers.

  11. Tuerqas says:

    But Carlos, there lies your ignorance. The German unions are quite different in structure and application even from other EU member unions, to say nothing of comparing them to the mob-like mentality of US unions. There is a reason the German industrial base still thrives amid a western civilization that largely subsists on remnants and resources.

    I fully admit those German character strengths of work ethic and following orders is what made Germany vulnerable to Hitler, but there is not anything more than a small minority of ‘lazy-butt’ workers in Germany and I daresay a majority of those are immigrants…

    If VW workers in Chattanooga could have been offered German fashioned worker councils, they would have been fools not to jump at it. There are a lot prevailing/failing European ideas in the US left, but the German unions are not part of them (and that is too bad). Comparing German union workers to US union workers is an apples to oranges comparison. Lefties mistakenly do that all the time to show how successful unions can be, and comparing UAW and IG Metall is a lefty mistake. Don’t make it.