QOTD: ‘Sex educator’ describes her *filmed* abortion as “like giving birth”

Abortion on Demand

Members of “Stop Patriarchy” demonstrate to support legal abortions in front of the Supreme Court 1-22-13.
Photo By Chris Maddaloni/CQ Roll Call

I’ll just go ahead and warn you – if you read this article in full, you’re probably going to want to literally scream — or punch a wall.  The “sex educator” featured in the article about actually FILMED her abortion in an attempt to erase the “stigma” that comes attached to an act that terminates the life of an unborn child.  I’ll provide some excerpts for those too sickened to click the link:

I found out I was pregnant in November. I had been working at the clinic for about a year. It was my first pregnancy, and, full disclosure, I hadn’t been using any kind of birth control, which is crazy, I know. I’m a sex educator, and I love talking about birth control. Before this experience, hormonal birth control scared me because of complications I’d heard about from friends — gaining weight, depression, etc. So I tracked my ovulation cycle, and I didn’t have any long-term partners. I thought I was OK. But, you know, things happen. I wound up pregnant.


nce I caught my breath, I knew immediately I was going to have an abortion. I knew I wasn’t ready to take care of a child. The guy wasn’t involved in my decision. I called my supervisor and said, “Excuse me, I am going to need to schedule one abortion, please.” It was very early in the pregnancy, only two to three weeks.

Patients at the clinic always ask me if I can relate to them — have I had an abortion? Do I have kids? I was so used to saying, “I’ve never had an abortion but…” While I was pregnant and waiting for my procedure, I thought, “Wait a minute, I have to use this.”


There are three options for a first-trimester abortion: medical abortion, which is the pill; a surgical abortion with IV sedation, where you’re asleep through the whole thing; and a surgical abortion with local anesthesia during which you’re awake. Women are most terrified of being awake.

I could have taken the pill, but I wanted to do the one that women were most afraid of. I wanted to show it wasn’t scary — and that there is such a thing as a positive abortion story. It’s my story.

Had enough yet? No? Here’s the part that will make your head spin:

I knew the cameras were in the room during the procedure, but I forgot about them almost immediately. I was focused on staying positive and feeling the love from everyone in the room. I am so lucky that I knew everyone involved, and I was so supported. I remember breathing and humming through it like I was giving birth. I know that sounds weird, but to me, this was as birth-like as it could be. It will always be a special memory for me. I still have my sonogram, and if my apartment were to catch fire, it would be the first thing I’d grab.

I can’t figure out what’s worse here: “Emily” deliberately choosing the medical abortion and then filming it, the irony of her describing the extinguishing of innocent unborn life as “birth-like”, or the fact that she seems staggeringly oblivious to her callousness in casually describing the type of procedure that many on “her side” of the aisle would characterize as “cruel and inhumane” if done to a death row inmate.

National Review’s Wesley J. Smith comments:

Her bottom line message:

“I am grateful that I can share my story and inspire other women to stop the guilt.”

But you know, sometimes guilt is healthy. Sometimes there’s a reason conscience knocks on our door. Sometimes it’s the first step toward gaining wisdom. And forgiveness. Because some things are just wrong.

And not just wrong – but immoral beyond description.  There is a better way here. Abortion most definitely isn’t the answer.

Leaked Chinese documents show planning for a North Korean collapse


**Posted by Phineas

"I've got some bad news, boss..."

“I’ve got some bad news, boss…”

To paraphrase Whoopie Goldberg, I’m pretty sure these weren’t “leaked-leaked,” so much as deliberately slipped to the Japanese, knowing they’d go public. It’s a not-so-subtle to warning to Dear Leader III: “If things fall apart, don’t count on us to bail you out:”

China has drawn up detailed contingency plans for the collapse of the North Korean government, suggesting that Beijing has little faith in the longevity of Kim Jong-un’s regime.

Documents drawn up by planners from China’s People’s Liberation Army that were leaked to Japanese media include proposals for detaining key North Korean leaders and the creation of refugee camps on the Chinese side of the frontier in the event of an outbreak of civil unrest in the secretive state.

The report calls for stepping up monitoring of China’s 879-mile border with North Korea.

Any senior North Korean military or political leaders who could be the target of either rival factions or another “military power,” thought to be a reference to the United States, should be given protection, the documents state.

According to Kyodo News, the Chinese report says key North Korean leaders should be detained in special camps where they can be monitored, but also prevented from directing further military operations or taking part in actions that could be damaging to China’s national interest.

The report suggests “foreign forces” could be involved in an incident that leads to the collapse of internal controls in North Korea, resulting to millions of refugees attempting to flee. The only route to safety the vast majority would have would be over the border into China.

“Foreign forces,” of course, being the United States and South Korea. Kim Jong Un’s behavior since taking power, from hysterical rhetoric to live-fire artillery drills in sensitive areas to his penchant for executing rivals in various psychopathic creative ways, and especially his continued pursuit of nuclear weapons, has to worry governments with security interests in Northeast Asia. And the last thing anyone wants is a Korean conflict that might again force Beijing to come to Pyongyang’s aid and place Chinese forces in combat against Americans. North Korea’s behavior has become unpredictable since L’il Kim took power, and a lack of predictability in Great Power relations makes everyone nervous. Hence a the message to Kim that’s about as subtle as a gun to the face: instead of helping you, we may put you in a camp, instead.

I don’t think it’s a coincidence that this Chinese report comes out at just about the same time we learn of credible reports that North Korea has developed nuclear warheads that can fit on an ICBM. Missiles that can reach the United States:

According to the 16-page report, “The North Korean Nuclear Threat to the United States,” the Defense Intelligence Agency stated in an unclassified assessment made public a year ago that “DIA assesses with moderate confidence the North [Korean government] currently has nuclear weapons capable of delivery by ballistic missiles.”

“This is disturbing news,” the report says. “The North Korean regime is one of the most fanatic, paranoid, and militaristic dictatorships on the planet. … While North Korea has long made occasional nuclear attack threats, the scope, magnitude, and frequency of these threats have vastly increased in 2013.”

North Korea has in the recent months issued provocative threats to carry out nuclear strikes on U.S. cities and against American allies.

By the way, the Obama administration is trying to deny the conclusions in this report, because it doesn’t fit with their diplomacy. Feel reassured.

Anyway, back to Chinese planning for a North Korean collapse, one has to wonder if the Chinese haven’t seen the same information as DIA (they have much better contacts than we with the regime, though they’ve worsened in recent years) and decided to let Pyongyang know that no help would be coming their way if they decided to play a game of nuclear chicken with us. Quite the contrary, in fact. In that case, it might even be in China’s interests to euthanize its ally before it could push us over the edge. I wouldn’t be at all surprised to find out they have a North Korean general on tap for a convenient coup, or that they were prepared to invade, themselves. For fraternal, humanitarian reasons, of course.

And let’s keep in mind that a military crisis might not be the catalyst for a North Korean state failure: East Germany fell apart after the Soviets left from sheer exhaustion, and the Soviet Union just sort of twitched and dissolved without us having to fire a shot. North Korea is subject to periodic severe famines, and the economy can’t produce what the people need. They’re only held in line through terror and constant propaganda — what if that suddenly stops working? Or what if some general decides he doesn’t want to be the next to go up against the wall? Rather than a military confrontation, Beijing might find itself dealing with hundreds of thousands of starving Koreans looking for food. Better to use the People’s Liberation Army to “restore order” south of the Yalu and keep those people from overwhelming the neighboring regions of Manchuria.

It’s a lot of speculation, I realize, which is all we have when dealing with a black box like North Korea. But, that the Chinese are taking the possibility of sudden regime collapse so seriously (and this isn’t the first time they’ve warned Pyongyang) means we should, too.

via Walter Russell Mead

RELATED: Earlier posts on North Korea.

(Crossposted at Public Secrets)

#NewTone: Senate Majority Leader Reid compares GOP to “greased rodeo pigs”

Harry Reid

Shame, shame, shame.

Via The Hill:

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) on Tuesday said trying to work with Republicans reminds him of chasing a greased pig at the rodeo.

“Oft times, working with some Senate Republicans feels a lot like chasing one of those greased pigs,” Reid said on the Senate floor Tuesday. “Anytime we get close to making progress it seems as though we watch it slip out of our hands, and Republicans scamper away.”

He said he enjoys going to the rodeo and watching the “greased pig contests,” where children chase around a greased piglet, but said the antics of Republicans aren’t as enjoyable.


Reid said Republicans first asked for a sense of the Senate vote on Keystone, but then decided they wanted a binding vote. Reid said he agreed and said Republicans could have votes on a total of five germane amendments, but as of last night he said they were demanding yet another amendment.

“It’s not a game,” Reid said. “It’s part of a calculated political scheme.”

He’s one to talk when it comes to being a “greased pig” calculating “political schemes”, but who’s counting?

Finally here: It’s primary day in North Carolina

Vote here

Sign at my polling place this morning.

After what seemed like forever, North Carolina voters go to the polls today to choose candidates for the fall elections.  The race that is attracting the most attention here, of course, is the one for the US Senate – where several Republican candidates are vying for the chance to try to defeat incumbent Senator – and key crafter of the Obamacare bill – Kay Hagan (D) in the fall.  NC General Assembly House Speaker Thom Tillis and OB-GYN Greg Brannon have consistently polled the highest in most polls taken over the last few months, but because there are so many candidates there is speculation that there may be a run-off because in order to win the primary here you must have at least 40% of the vote.

In any event, I cast my ballot today in the US Senate primary and the NC12 primary (where I know the GOP winner will have little hope of winning in the fall – Mel Watt’s district, FYI) at a local elementary school just as some of the kids were getting off their buses.  One little girl said hello to me as she peered into the voting room (gym) with big eyes. It was so precious – and a refresher to anyone who may have forgotten that children are the ones whose futures we’re voting to protect.

Lord willing, I’ll be on later this evening to live-tweet polling results from NC as they come in on several races.  Polls close at 7:30 ET. You can follow me here, and in the event I tweet too much, I’ll tweet here for NC results.  Here’s the state’s official link for voting results.