#CommonCore: turning History into anti-American propaganda

Posted by: Phineas on December 4, 2013 at 9:01 pm

**Posted by Phineas

x

Necessary

I honestly haven’t followed the controversy over the proposed Common Core national educational standards all that closely (1), though I’m somewhat familiar with the questions of lowered standards, loss of local control, and the constitutional issue over a national curriculum. But I do not claim to be an expert.

If, however, this is representative of how American History is to be taught, I’ll be reaching for my pitchfork and torch. The textbook in question is Prentice-Hall’s “The American Experience,” and its chapter on the Second World War, as well as the accompanying teacher’s manual, takes a, shall we say, “slanted” view of the war:

The opening page of the slim chapter devoted to World War II called “War Shock” features a photograph of a woman inspecting a large stockpile of thousand-pound bomb castings. The notes in the margins of the Teacher’s Edition set the tone:

“In this section, nonfiction prose and a single stark poem etch into a reader’s mind the dehumanizing horror of world war. . . .”

The editors of the textbook script the question teachers are supposed to ask students in light of the photograph as well as provide the answer:

Ask: What dominant impression do you take away from this photograph?

Possible response: Students may say that the piled rows of giant munitions give a strong impression of America’s power of mass production and the bombs’ potential for mass destruction.”

Translation: Americans made lots of big bombs that killed lots of people.

The principal selection of the chapter is taken from John Hersey’s Hiroshima. It is a description of ordinary men and women in Hiroshima living out their lives the day the bomb was dropped. A couple of lines reveal the spirit of the document:

“The Reverend Mr. Tanimoto got up at five o’clock that morning. He was alone in the parsonage, because for some time his wife had been commuting with their year-old baby to spend nights with a friend in Ushida, a suburb to the north.”

Further prompts from the margins of the Teacher’s Edition indicate how the selection is to be read and taught:

“World War II has been called a popular war in which the issues that spurred the conflict were clearly defined. . . . Nevertheless, technological advances . . . [and the media] brought home the horrors of war in a new way. Although a serious antiwar movement in the United States did not become a reality until the 1960s, these works by Hersey and by Jarrell take their place in the ranks of early antiwar literature.

Have students think about and record in writing their personal feelings about war. Encourage students to list images of war that they recall vividly. [Conveniently, there is a photograph of the devastation in Hiroshima next to this prompt].

Tell students they will revisit their feelings about war after they have read these selections.”

The entire section is littered with questions and prompts in this vein and plenty of photos that show the destruction of Hiroshima. In case the students would be inclined to take the American side in this conflict, the editors see to it that teachers will remind the students repeatedly that there are two sides in every war:

“Think Aloud: Model the Skill
Say to students:
When I was reading the history textbook, I noticed that the writer included profiles of three war heroes, all of whom fought for the Allies. The writer did not include similar profiles for fighters on the other side. I realize that this choice reflects a political assumption: that readers want to read about only their side’s heroes.

. . . Mr. Tanimoto is on the side of “the enemy.” Explain that to vilify is to make malicious statements about someone. During wartime, it is common to vilify people on the other side, or “the enemy.””

After a dozen pages of Hersey’s Hiroshima (the same number given to Benjamin Franklin in volume one of The American Experience), students encounter the anti-war, anti-heroic poem by Randall Jarell, “The Death of the Ball Turrett Gunner.” The last line in this short poem sums up the sentiment: “When I died they washed me out of the turret with a hose.” The textbook editors zero in for the kill:

“Take a position: Jarrell based his poem on observations of World War II, a war that has been called “the good war.” Is there such a thing as a “good war”? Explain.

Possible response: [In the Teacher’s Edition] Students may concede that some wars, such as World War II, are more justified than others, but may still feel that “good” is not an appropriate adjective for any war.”

This is not a history lesson. It is anti-war propaganda masquerading as history. This is garbage designed to at best place America and Imperial Japan on an ambiguously equal moral ground, and at worst to make us out to be a villain or aggressor in the conflict. To focus on the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki without presenting the reasons for the attack is intellectually bankrupt. The Truman administration dropped the bombs because of the experience of fanatical Japanese resistance along a whole string of islands, where again and again Imperial Japanese Army units fought until nearly wiped out. Imagine that occurring on the Japanese Home Islands themselves, in the event of invasion; bear in mind that the Japanese government was not of a mind to surrender and indeed was talking about “70 million dead” (essentially, fighting to the last man, woman, and child), and then look at the casualty estimates for just the American invasion forces, for which figures of 500,000 killed and wounded were common. And, should the invasion have been delayed until 1946 or the islands simply besieged, there was a very real risk of famine and the  mass starvation of hundreds of thousands, if not millions, because transportation networks had been destroyed. And that doesn’t even begin to account for hundreds of millions suffering under Japanese rule and who needed the war to end as swiftly as possible.

Beyond the question of military necessity and the lesser of two evils, Common Core “standards” engage in moral relativism. While quoting Hersey’s “Hiroshima” (actually, a good book) and Jarrell’s poem, students are apparently left in the dark about Japan’s aggressive intentions and regular atrocities from the 1930s through the end. No mention of the invasion of Manchuria, the war on China, the Rape of Nanking, the Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere, Unit 731, or the horrors suffered by prisoners of war and civilians living under Japanese rule.

But we do get pictures of American bombs, vivid descriptions of the wreck of Hiroshima, and the lasting impression that we were the ones committing evil, not doing what was necessary to end it.

Let me be blunt: Imperial Japan was evil and had subjected Asia and the Pacific to a horrific nightmare, all to satisfy a national ideology that dehumanized everyone else. Once the war had started, it had to be crushed; the Truman administration was right drop the atomic bombs to force Japan’s surrender (2). It would have been a greater evil to let the war drag on. And while innocent people died in the fight against Japan, to teach any sort of moral equivalence between the two nations is insulting and obscene.

And yet these are the new standards? This isn’t education, it’s pedagogical malpractice.

Footnote:
(1) On the other hand, Michelle Malkin has been an avenging angel on the topic.
(2) A superb book on the end of the war and the decision to use atomic weapons is Frank’s “Downfall: the End of the Imperial Japanese Empire.”

(Crossposted at Public Secrets)

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7 Responses to “#CommonCore: turning History into anti-American propaganda”

Comments

  1. Grumpy says:

    I’m afraid you’re gonna need to dig out your pitchfork.. you can find tar at any mason or roofing supply house, feathers I’m not so sure about..

    This particular lesson plan is one of thousands of Common Core Aligned Lesson Plans that completely distort history.

    If that’s not enough, then you can look at data that’s being collected by the government on every child in the country.. The data points include a huge amount of personal information- Religion, Parents Voting Records and so on. With computerized gradebooks, every assignment, every grade, every trip to the principals office becomes part of a child’s very permanent record..

    In fact the Secretary of Education has suggested that when a child leaves school, the information should be turned over to the Department of Labor .

    The folks at EAG News and Missouri Education Watchdog have been keeping a close eye on Common Core for several years.. Sara Noble’s Independent Sentinel is keeping a close eye on it in New York State.

    It’s scary

    I just linked your post

  2. GOP Warrior says:

    Is there any reference to the destruction, rape, and pillaging of the Filipino islands when the Japanese invaded? Or the sneak attack on Pearl Harbor? The U.S. was never the aggressor, but today’s Liberals want our children to feel repentant for our history and soften the patriotism that was instilled in us from an early age.

    This is sickening and frightening all in one.

  3. Ryan says:

    I would suspect that many of the folks who love this type of teaching are also of the “no blood for oil” variety. They should know that a big reason Japan attacked Pearl Harbor was because they viewed the U.S. Pacific Fleet as a threat to their activities, specifically gaining access to natural resources such as oil in the Dutch East Indies.

  4. Veritas says:

    I suppose if the bomb had not been dropped the resulting slaughter of the Japanese and Americans would have been a better moral outcome?

    The American education system is a bad joke. My children will not be indoctrinated no matter what sacrifices I must make.

  5. Carlos says:

    Probably too late to say it, but, WAKE UP, FOLKS!

    This kind of thing has been going on for decades at the college level. That’s why the teachers (who never had a clue about true history to begin with) are comfortable teaching this crap. That’s what they were taught.

  6. bobmontgomery says:

    What Carlos said. Plus, in case you hadn’t heard, they actually want your kids to start going to school when they’re three, and eventually, straight from the womb. They will be taught not only how to think, and what facts their masters want them to be in possession of, but they will be taught how to act (read “obey”) as well.
    It’s what’s called a natural progression of control.
    The over-65 crowd is the last generation to remember when America was truly America. Therefore, IPAB, if you know what I mean.