The latest on the Arizona immigration bill controversy

Posted by: ST on April 28, 2010 at 8:50 am

In the newz today (via Memeorandum):

—- While Karl Rove sympathizes with the rationale behind the bill, he said yesterday, “I think there is going to be some constitutional problems with the bill … I wished they hadn’t passed it, in a way.”

—- Jeb Bush thinks handling illegal immigration should remain a federal issue to tackle: “I think it creates unintended consequences,” he said in a telephone interview with POLITICO Tuesday. “It’s difficult for me to imagine how you’re going to enforce this law. It places a significant burden on local law enforcement and you have civil liberties issues that are significant as well …I don’t think this is the proper approach.”

—- Senator Lindsey Graham:

Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham (S.C.) said Tuesday he thinks Arizona’s new immigration law is unconstitutional and that “it doesn’t represent the best way forward” when it comes to addressing illegal immigration.

He added, however, that the law reflects “what good people will do” when they are left with no other options.

Speaking at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing today with Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano, Graham said Congress eventually needs to tackle immigration reform but that it will be “impossible” to achieve reform until citizens in states like Arizona feel that the borders are secure.

“In this environment there is no hope of it passing,” he said.

Graham’s steadfast opposition to tackling immigration “reform” during an election year due to valid concerns that Democrats are trying to use the issue for political gain appears to have influenced Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid to “amend” his Senate priorities, with immigration “reform” no longer standing front and center on the immediate radar – for the time being, anyway.

—- The most measured statement from a prominent GOP public official comes from GOP candidate for Senate Marco Rubio – no fan of “amnesty,” who expressed concerns about the bill both from a law enforcement angle as well as a Hispanic angle in a statement yesterday but stopped short of saying he opposed it, contra to Ben Smith’s assertions that Rubio’s statement equated to him “opposing” the bill.

—- Reuters has published a sympathetic piece towards illegal immigrants in AZ but unintentionally notes that the law is already having the desired effect of making illegals weigh their options as to whether or not to stay here or go back to Mexico.

—- With President Obama onboard as a full-blown critic of the bill, AG Eric Holder is hinting around that the US could issue a court challenge to the Arizona law, while Homeland Security Chief Janet Napolitano is complaining about already “stretched” ICE resources. Of course the Obama administration doesn’t want any individual state to handle what he believes los federales should (as is the case with, well, every issue in this administration) …

And speaking of President Obama, does a bigger liar not exist in the Democrat party?

OTTUMWA, IA — Asked about his plan for undocumented workers at a town hall this evening in Ottumwa, IA, President Obama referred to “this law that just passed in Arizona which I think is a poorly conceived law.”

The president said, “you can try to make it really tough on people who look like they, quote, unquote look like illegal immigrants. One of the things that the law says is that local officials are allow to ask somebody who they have a suspicion might be an illegal immigrant for their papers — but you can imagine if you are a Hispanic American in Arizona, your great, great grandparents may have been there before Arizona was even a state. But now suddenly if you don’t have your papers and you took your kid out to get ice cream, you’re going to be harassed, that’s something that could potentially happen.”

“That’s not the right way to go,” the president said to the crowd at Indian Hills Community College.

What absolutely shameful (and unsurprising) racial demagoguery, demagoguery for which he should be called out on. The MSM, of course, won’t, but conservative pundits will. Which leads me to:

—- National Review’s Rich Lowry decries the “hysteria” – and tries to clear up some of the questions – surrounding some of the more rabid critiques of the bill, most of them coming from The Usual Suspects on the left. The Washington Examiner’s Byron York is on a similar path with his defense of the bill here. Please consider both pieces must-reads.

—- Last but not least, how does Mexico treat its illegals? Michelle Malkin has the lowdown here.

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16 Responses to “The latest on the Arizona immigration bill controversy”

Comments

  1. NC Cop says:

    I don’t know why everyone is so upset by this. The feds refused to act so the PEOPLE VOTED to take action. The things passed in this law are things that, for the most part, already occur in law enforcement.

    If we investigate a subject for a robbery, burglary, or other violent crime, we check to see if they are an illegal immigrant. If they are then we notify immigration to get them deported.

    We do not randomly walk around asking Hispanic people for their “papers”.

    My only concern, from a law enforcement view, is that illegals who are victims of crimes may be afraid to contact police for fear of being deported. What the Arizona law should say is that in the course of investigations into SUSPECTS, they will be deported.

    If illegal immigrants are afraid to call the police after being a victim of a crime, criminals may prey on that fact and target them.

  2. Jenny says:

    Can’t help but wonder, given the rumors about Graham of late, if the dems have some very embarrassing evidence they have threatened to make public, to force Graham’s support of controversial legislation to make it appear “bipartisan”.

  3. chris says:

    1.4 million green cards every year for legal immigrants is enough.
    2 million+ new citizens every year are enough

    Don’t let the leftists and open border crew conflate legal (good) and illegal (bad) to build sympathy for lawbreakers.

    If we want more legal immigrants, work through the legislative process.

    Meanwhile, taking the oath means enforcing our laws. You don’t like the laws, work to change them or run for office.

  4. Berni says:

    So what if there are constitutional problems with the Arizona immigration law. Ignore the Constitution just like the Democrats do. Problem solved.

  5. Carlos says:

    Berni, one of the big problems we conservatives have with the jackasses (Demo and Republican) is that they DO ignore the Constitution. So we’re to become like them?

    Kinda sounds like blowing up a town in order to save it, to me anyway…

  6. Drew says:

    “What absolutely shameful (and unsurprising) racial demagoguery, demagoguery for which he should be called out on…..The MSM…”

    Remember seeing the play “Waiting for Godot?” And we all know how that turned out. :(

  7. H. Crane says:

    :-?:-? In Florida you have to show ID to buy cigarettes…whats the big stink

  8. WarEagle says:

    Geez, what more could they have on Grahamnesty besides being Lindsay Graham? It can’t get more embarrassing that that…

    Jenny says:
    April 28, 2010 at 11:05 am

    Can’t help but wonder, given the rumors about Graham of late, if the dems have some very embarrassing evidence they have threatened to make public, to force Graham’s support of controversial legislation to make it appear “bipartisan”.

  9. Pasadena Phil says:

    Please make a mental note of all of the Republicans who are still squishy on this issue. They, like McCain, are trying to appear to be with the majority of Americans on border security but are being very cagey about how they word their support so that later, they can claim that they were against the AZ bill. Just listen to McCain’s statement where he refuses to elaborate on his “concerns” about “certain aspects” of the law but defends AZ’s decision to pass it.

    Nothing new. That is how these guys plan to cram amnesty down our throats later, if the are still around. Very disappointing to hear this coming from Rubio though. I expect it from the rest.

  10. Rorschach says:

    Meanwhile he refuses to show anyone HIS papers… maybe he’s afraid that if he went to Arizona we’d finally learn what we’ve all known deep down all along, that Obama really ISN’T an American after all.

    The constitution recognizes that the people are endowed with natural rights and that we delegate some of those rights and responsibilities to the state for the common good, and the states turn around and delegate some of THOSE rights and responsibilities to the federal Government. but when you delegate a responsibility you are not giving up ultimate responsibility yourself. When you hire a guy to work for you and you delegate a job to him and he does not do that job for one reason or another, you still have to do the job yourself if he doesn’t.

  11. mary says:

    Those who are against this bill want to see the sovreigntry of this country destroyed.
    Grijalva actually said he wants them legalized as they flow across the border…..no fence needed or guards…because a Bigger Mexican country is what he wants! He should be forced to step down!

  12. W.C.Camp says:

    My major problem with the law is I think it is too hard for the police to enforce without having somebody on either side trying to initiate legal action. In general I like most lawful people, do not have problem with immigrants AS LONG AS THEY FOLLOW THE RULES. Geez, this law generally just tries to do the job that the Feds should already be doing. I discuss more in my blog.
    Nice Post. W.C.C.

    LINK

  13. Jo says:

    Mexico’s immigration laws require that immigrants:

    * have the means to sustain themselves economically;

    * not destined to be burdens on society;

    * of economic and social benefit to society;

    * of good character and have no criminal records; and

    * contributors to the general well-being of the nation.

    The law also ensures that:

    * immigration authorities have a record of each foreign visitor;

    * foreign visitors do not violate their visa status;

    * foreign visitors are banned from interfering in the country’s internal politics;

    * foreign visitors who enter under false pretenses are imprisoned or deported;

    * foreign visitors violating the terms of their entry are imprisoned or deported;

    * those who aid in illegal immigration will be sent to prison.

    I say we adopt that plan, huh?

  14. Tango says:

    …with each passing day it becomes more evident that the voting public will NOT tolerate “fence sitting” politicians on the illegal immigration matter. **==**==

  15. begunzal says:

    I’ve read so many titles about this law, and so called civil rights people and groups and unions filing a law suit or protesting to protect the rights of illegals, but what about OUR rights? I mean the rights of Mexicans that came here legally, and are following the laws, and are following all directions to become citizens.

    I don’t live in AZ but my sister and her family do, they came here legally, not for a job, but out of fear, they were hoping that by leaving Mexico they would escape the violence and corrupt government. They still live in that same fear because they unfortunately they moved to AZ because they said it made them feel not so far from home.

    I hear from my sister daily about her husband not being able to find work because it was filled by an illegal day laborer, she can’t find work for the same reason. They have two sons that didn’t want to leave all they knew and their friends, but as their parents they made the decision that they had to protect them.

    My nephews love their parents, and see them struggle but don’t know the complications of why, the drug cartels and coyotes that they sought to flee are being empowered by not enforcing the protection of immigration laws. My nephews will fall victims to them out of love for their parents, never realizing the love their parents have for them willing to fight for them.

    These people that say they are fighting for rights need to look out for my sister and her family, they need to look them in the eye and tell them whose rights they are fighting for.

  16. begunzal says:

    After reading comments on many sites I’ve seen this more than once.

    “My only concern, from a law enforcement view, is that illegals who are victims of crimes may be afraid to contact police for fear of being deported. What the Arizona law should say is that in the course of investigations into SUSPECTS, they will be deported.

    If illegal immigrants are afraid to call the police after being a victim of a crime, criminals may prey on that fact and target them.”

    I have a lot of problems with this. To begin with policemen aren’t social workers and wouldn’t have such concern. They respond to all kinds of calls and don’t worry about what calls they aren’t getting, and even bigger, anyone can call the police anonymously and their call will be treated seriously and police sent, no one will ask their name, address and proof of citizenship, the person that is posting this everywhere is either a fake, or a very bigoted cop, I’m going with fake because of flooded times I’ve seen it. If they really are a police officer, they sure have loads of time on their hands and have an odd way of spending it because most law officials I know avoid anything like this when they have time to relax and go in to shut down mode