Goodbye, Robin Williams

Posted by: ST on August 12, 2014 at 10:08 am
Robin Williams as Mork

Robin Williams as Mork on the ‘Mork and Mindy’ show.

Like everyone else on the planet, I was stunned and saddened to read the news last night of comedian Robin Williams’ death:

Oscar-winning actor and comedian Robin Williams, who dazzled in such wide-ranging dramatic and comedic roles as alien, nanny, therapist and cartoon genie during a four-decades long career, was found dead in his northern California home in a suspected suicide Monday. He was 63.

The Marin County Sheriff’s Department said in a statement that Williams was found unconscious and not breathing in his home around noon. The statement said the investigation into Williams’ death is ongoing, but the coroner “suspects the death to be a suicide due to asphyxia.”

The Marin County coroner’s office said Williams was last seen alive at home at about 10 p.m. Sunday. An emergency call from his house in Tiburon was placed to the Sheriff’s Department shortly before noon Monday.

A representative for Williams said in a statement the actor had been battling “severe depression of late.”

“This is a tragic and sudden loss,” Mara Buxbaum said. “The family respectfully asks for their privacy as they grieve during this very difficult time.”

Williams’ wife Susan Schneider said in a statement she is devastated and asked for privacy.

“This morning, I lost my husband and my best friend, while the world lost one of its most beloved artists and beautiful human beings,” she said. “I am utterly heartbroken. On behalf of Robin’s family, we are asking for privacy during our time of profound grief. As he is remembered, it is our hope the focus will not be on Robin’s death, but on the countless moments of joy and laughter he gave to millions.”

Williams publicly struggled with addiction during his career and most recently went to rehab in June to “fine tune” his sobriety, his rep said at the time.

Naturally, Twitter erupted, and his fellow celebrities expressed their shock, sadness, and condolences over the loss of this remarkable, unforgettable man who touched the lives of so many.

The death of someone is never easy to handle, but when you read it’s from apparent suicide, your heart just absolutely breaks, and you wonder “what could I have done that maybe would have led to a different outcome?”

If you’re in a position in your life where you think hope is lost, IT ISN’T. Reach out and talk to someone. If you want it to remain anonymous, call the Suicide Prevention Hotline.  1-800-273-TALK (8255).  You are never alone, and please always remember that people care about and love you.

My thoughts and prayers go out to Williams’ family.  It goes without saying that although he is gone, he will not be forgotten.

RSS feed for comments on this post.

4 Responses to “Goodbye, Robin Williams”

Comments

  1. Zippy says:

    What a great talent. Very sad.

  2. TomTB says:

    I reckon we all have known a suicide at some point, and it always is a permanent solution to a temporary problem.
    Our Creator wants us to cherish life, as imperfect as we might be.

  3. Drew the Infidel says:

    Suicide being a permanent solution to a temporary problem has always been one of main points concerning it. Williams was financially solvent at one time and possibly could have been so again.

    The Bible also teaches that it is the one sin for which you are going straight to hell.

    Despite the sappy media arguments on the left, Williams is NOT a suicide “victim” (there’s that word again). The family and others left to bear the consequences of his actions are the real victims. A victim suffers by the hand of another; Williams took his own life. You cannot be a perpetrator and a victim at the same time.

    “Besides this you know what hour it is, how it is full time now for you to wake from sleep. For salvation is nearer to us now than when we first believed; the night is far gone, the day is at hand.”–Romans 13:11-12

  4. Neo says:

    Williams’ wife, Susan Schneider, statement:

    “Robin spent so much of his life helping others. Whether he was entertaining millions on stage, film or television, our troops on the frontlines, or comforting a sick child — Robin wanted us to laugh and to feel less afraid.

    Since his passing, all of us who loved Robin have found some solace in the tremendous outpouring of affection and admiration for him from the millions of people whose lives he touched. His greatest legacy, besides his three children, is the joy and happiness he offered to others, particularly to those fighting personal battles.

    Robin’s sobriety was intact and he was brave as he struggled with his own battles of depression, anxiety as well as early stages of Parkinson’s Disease, which he was not yet ready to share publicly.

    It is our hope in the wake of Robin’s tragic passing, that others will find the strength to seek the care and support they need to treat whatever battles they are facing so they may feel less afraid.”