Murkowski still playing games on Alaska Senate seat possibilities

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The Murkowski drama in Alaska continues to drag on:

Sen. Lisa Murkowski says she’ll decide Friday whether to run for re-election as a write-in candidate.

The Alaska Republican, who lost her party’s primary last month in one of the year’s biggest election shockers, just released a statement saying she has ruled out taking the Libertarian Party line on the ballot, leaving herself “the more difficult task of running a write-in campaign should I decide to continue in the race.”

She said she lost the race because “the Alaska Republican Party was hijacked by the Tea Party Express, an outside extremist group.” Her statement did not mention former Alaska governor Sarah Palin, who along with the Tea Party Express backed Murkowski’s successsful GOP challenger, Joe Miller.

“Extremist group”? I don’t always agree with Tea Partiers but to call the group on the whole “extreme” is, well, rather extreme – and desperate. Hopefully this last gasp stunt will be enough to sour a majority of Alaskans’ opinions of her once and for all, no matter what she decides on Friday.

France: “Dad” to 55 children arrested on paternity fraud charges

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Unreal:

PARIS (Reuters) – A Paris man who registered 55 children by 55 different mothers faces up to 10 years in jail and fines for suspected paternity fraud and for helping to obtain residency under false pretences, police said on Friday.

The 54 year-old of African origin, who authorities did not identify, was arrested in his two-room flat in Paris during a police raid which yielded documents showing more than 50 people were registered as living at that address.

Police suspect the man was involved in a social benefits scam which could have been costing the state over 1 million euros ($1.27 million) annually in claims by the mothers.

“At the moment 42 women have been identified and each claim that the man is the biological father of their child,” Paris police said in a statement.

Authorities said the man claimed he met the women at bars, night spots and occasionally during visits to their home countries, including Senegal, Cameroon and Mali.

He should have come to America to do this if he wanted to get away with it. Here, the government doesn’t call it “fraud.” They call it “welfare.”